HIST 201

World History to 1500

Course Description: Course Description: This course, World History I, is a comprehensive summary of human history from ancient times to the 1500s. The course presents important features of humanity events which has substantially affected human lives. World history includes the study of various forms of written records and additional information from other sources, including archaeology. While ancient history does not begin with written records, the course will emphasize the beginnings of this phenomenon.  This course will cover humanity's prehistory including such periods as the Paleolithic Era (Early Stone Age), the Neolithic Era (New Stone Age), and Agricultural Revolution (between 8000 and 5000 BCE) and how this system was evidenced independently and how it spread to neighboring regions. World history I emphasizes the impact of surplus food, the division of labor, the development of classes of people, and the rise of cities. In terms of representative civilizations, the course will examine what constitutes civilization and how these societies developed along waterways, including but not limited to: Mesopotamia (the "land between the Rivers" Euphrates and Tigris), the Nile River in Egypt, and the Indus River valley, and in China. The course progresses to include the history of the European Old world, Asiatic and African civilizations, and the early history of the Americas. Some of the themes covered include: invasion, governance, renaissance, enlightenment, industrial revolution, the rise and fall of empires, science and technology, and human inventions that changed the way people live and communicate. (3 Credits/F15)

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Photo by czekma13/iStock / Getty Images
Photo by czekma13/iStock / Getty Images

HIST 426

Introduction to the History of the Middle East

Course Description: Course Description (Extended): This course, History of the Middle East, is a comprehensive survey of the Near Eastern history from ancient times to approximately the 1960s. Middle Eastern history includes an analysis of the geo-political concept of "Middle East" in global history. As in world history, the course will examine various forms of writing and additional evidence from other sources, including linguistics and archaeology. This course will cover Near Eastern prehistory including such periods as the Paleolithic Era (Early Stone Age), the Neolithic Era (New Stone Age), and Agricultural Revolution (between 8000 and 5000 BCE). The course also emphasizes the impact of surplus food, the division of labor, the development of social classes, and the growth of cities. In terms of representative first civilizations, the course will examine what constitutes a civilization and how these societies advanced along waterways, including but not limited to the immense importance of Mesopotamia (the "land between the Rivers" Euphrates and Tigris), the Nile River in Egypt, Syria, Anatolia, and the Indus River valley. The course progresses to include the critical history of the European old world, Asiatic and African civilizations, and the convergence of diverse people in the development of the Middle East. In addition to the Judeo-Christian-Islamic sacred realm, some of the basic course themes covered include military invasion, governance, mythology, culture, industry and economy, the rise and fall of empires, and science and technology. These themes will be covered through the birth of the Prophet Muhammad and the spread of Islam, The Early Arab Conquests, The Byzantine Empire, The European Crusades, the Ottoman Empire, World Wars I and II, and the Era of Nassar. This course will emphasize the early, ancient foundations of the Middle East, rather than the contemporary geo-political struggles and ideologies. However, the course will address the challenges to understanding the modern history from the decline of the Ottoman Empire through the rise of Arab Nationalism and interests in Middle Eastern Sovereignty and the rise of political Islam. UPPER CLASS (3 Credits/F15)

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HIST 442

African American History Through Film

Photo by ktsimage/iStock / Getty Images
Photo by ktsimage/iStock / Getty Images

Course Description: This class is a survey of African-American history in the United States to 1877. The selected aspects of African-American history will be covered at an introductory level. Through a broad overview of the following subjects, students will be introduced to the development of African-American society through several expressions—including, but not limited to—literature, music, theatre, politics, religion, history, philosophy and psychology. This introductory survey of topics will also examine the African past as well as. Important topics include: the African background, religion and the Black church, slavery and rise of the Atlantic Slave Trade, resistance, antebellum civil rights struggles and prevailing theories of race and race relations. This survey course introduces the major themes in African-American history giving special emphasis to the events, people, and ideas that have made a distinctive contribution. This course is designed to lay a foundation for the further study of African American history or any related discipline. Students will acquire factual information, and analyze, synthesize, and evaluate those historical facts. UPPER CLASS (3 Credits/F15)

http://www.coppin.edu

If you’re doing something outside of dominant culture, there’s not an easy place for you. You will have to do it yourself.
— Ava DuVernay, Film Maker